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Vintage California Cuisine: 300 Recipes from the First Cookbooks Published in the Golden State

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Vintage California Cuisine
300 Recipes from 19th and Early 20th Century Cookbooks


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California cuisine became an international culinary phenomenon in the 1970s, emphasizing fresh, seasonal ingredients, in combinations inspired by a diverse array of ethnic traditions. Vintage California Cuisine shows how the pieces of that culinary puzzle began to emerge more than a century ago, in cookbooks published by celebrity chefs, vegetarian advocates, ordinary housewives and others. This 152-page book features a selection of 300 recipes reprinted from 13 of the most interesting early California cookbooks, and tells the story of the authors of each volume. The recipes include:

* Walnut Catsup and Grape Pickles from the first California cookbook, How to Keep a Husband, published in 1872

* Oyster Croquettes and Cherry Chutney from What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in San Francisco in 1881 by a former slave

* Fig Marmalade and Quail a la Spanish from Santa Barbara Recipes, published in 1888

* Clayton's Celebrated California Salad Dressing, from an 1884 cookbook by an entrepreneurial San Francisco caterer, who was the first to recognize that California was worthy of cuisine that it could call its own

* Two dozen recipes translated from El Cocinero Espanol, a Spanish language cookbook published in 1898, which revealed the richness of the state's Spanish and Mexican heritage

* and more than three dozen recipes from two early vegetarian cookbooks

Many of these recipes are reprinted in this book for the first time since they originally appeared. Vintage California Cuisine brings them all together in one volume for the first time ever.

You'll find a sampling of recipes from the book below...

INDEX

MAIN COURSES

Nut and Potato Roast
Bean and Nut Loaf
Sole Edward VII
Peruvian Stuffed Peppers
Bacon and Oranges
An English Monkey

VEGETABLES

Sweet Potato Croquettes
Baked Stuffed Cucumbers
Celery Victor

SALADS AND DRESSINGS

Aunt Susan’s Salad Dressing
Salad Cream
Clayton’s Celebrated California Salad Dressing
Celery Vinegar

PICKLES AND PRESERVES

Sweet Watermelon Rind Pickle
Candied Peaches
Sunny Southern Preserved Oranges


CONDIMENTS AND SAUCES

Grape Catsup
Plum Catsup
Mushroom Catsup
Bernalillo Chile Sauce
Orange Sauce for Duck

DESSERTS

Avocado Icecream
Boiled Orange Pudding
Peaches a la Princesse
Zabaione
Jumble Cake
Creole Oranges
Orange Syrup

 

MAIN COURSES

Nut and Potato Roast

Raw potato, large, 1
Walnut meats, 1 cup
Bread crumbs, 1 cup
Eggs 2
Butter, size of walnut
Onion, small 1
Hot water, 1 cup
Salt
Tomatoes, strained one pint

Grind the walnut meats, onion and raw potato through a vegetable mill and mix with hot water, bread cubes, eggs, butter and salt. Make a layer in the center of a granite pan, and pour over the hot strained tomatoes. Bake in a medium oven for one hour, basting occasionally with the tomato. If it is liable to burn on top, it should be covered.

Vegetarian Cook Book: Substitutes for Flesh Foods (1910)


Bean and Nut Loaf

White beans, 1 cup
Onion, cup
Sage
Bread crumbs, toasted, or granola
Walnuts, chopped, 1 cup
Egg, 1
Salt

Thoroughly wash the beans and soak overnight. Boil thoroughly and when done rub through a colander. Add the chopped walnuts, eggs, onion braised in olive oil, sage and salt to taste. Thicken with granola or toasted bread crumbs. Put into an oiled pan and bake. Serve with gravy.

Vegetarian Cook Book: Substitutes for Flesh Foods (1910)


Sole Edward VII

Cut the fillets out of one sole and lay them flat on a buttered pan, and season with salt and pepper. Make the following mixture and spread over each fillet of sole: take one-half pound of sweet butter, three ounces of chopped salted almonds, one fourth pound of chopped fresh mushrooms, a little chopped parsley, the juice of a lemon, salt, pepper and a little grated nutmeg. Add to the pan one half glassful of white wine and put in the oven for twenty minutes. When done serve in the pan by placing it on a platter, with a napkin under it.

Bohemian San Francisco: Its Restaurants and Their Most Famous Recipes (1914)


Peruvian Albondigas
(Stuffed green peppers; the Mexican Albondiga is entirely different)

Boil mutton till tender. Scald large green chile peppers and remove their thin outer skin. Hash the meat and make it into a stuffing with raisins, stoned ripe olives and hard-boiled eggs minced fine. Fill the peppers with this stuffing and put them in a pot in which has already been prepared a sauce of tomatoes, whole red chile peppers, raisins, onion and a little broth, and heat slowly, twenty minutes, without stirring. Garlic can be added.

Landmarks Club Cookbook (1903)


Bacon and Oranges

Try this some morning for breakfast. Take twelve strips of bacon, twelve slices of oranges, three teaspoons sugar and a little cornmeal. Fry bacon until crisp and remove to hot platter. Slice oranges, sprinkle lightly with sugar, dip in cornmeal and fry quickly in hot bacon fat. Arrange on platter around bacon and serve immediately.

Nellie Aldridge’s National Orange Show Cookbook (1928)


An English Monkey

Soak one cupful of bread crumbs in one cupful of milk about 10 or 15 minutes. Melt one tablespoon of butter, add one cupful of cheese broken into small pieces; Stir until melted, add the crumbs and one beaten egg, one half teaspoon of salt, a few grains of bicarbonate of soda as large as a pea. Cook for five minutes. Serve on wafers.

Practical Vegetarian Cookery (1897)

chefart.gif (2886 bytes)
Art from Il Cuoco Segreto Di Papa Pio V (The Private Chef  of Pope Pius V), by Bartolomeo Scappi, Venice, 1570

VEGETABLES

Sweet Potato Croquettes

Boil, peel and mash six large sweet potatoes; season with salt, a tablespoon of butter, one of sugar and a little pepper. When cold, mold into croquettes, dip into beaten egg, then into finely rolled bread crumbs, and fry brown in hot fat.

Practical Vegetarian Cookery (1897)


Baked Stuffed Cucumbers

Take cucumbers of fairly good size—say six to eight inches in length; cut them in two lengthwise and scoop out the inside, seeds and all, but leave the outside shell whole and thick enough to be firm. Put the seeds and pulp into the chopping bowl, and add salt and pepper, or green chile peppers chopped very fine; tomato and bread crumbs; Chop all very find and mix well; fill each half shell, and put plenty of butter in the stuffing and on top, so it will brown well. Bake in a hot oven for an hour. The stuffing should be very hot in seasoning and the cooking thoroughly done.

Landmarks Club Cookbook (1903)


Celery Victor

Take six stalks of celery well washed. Make a stock of one soup hen or chicken bones, and five pounds of veal bones in the usual manner, with carrots, onions, parsley, bay leaves, salt and pepper. Place the celery in a vessel and strain the broth over it. Boil until soft and let cool off in its own broth. When cold, press the broth out of the celery with the hand, gently, and place on a plate. Season with salt, fresh ground black pepper, chervil, and a one-quarter white wine vinegar with tarragon to three-quarters of best olive oil.

Bohemian San Francisco: Its Restaurants and Their Most Famous Recipes (1914)

ladles.gif (1054 bytes)

SALADS AND DRESSINGS

Aunt Susan’s Salad Dressing

Beat together one level teaspoonful of mustard, one heaping teaspoon of sugar, one dessertspoonful of melted butter, one half teaspoon of salt and the yolk of one egg; add one cupful of milk and cook in double boiler until it thickens; stirring all the while. When thick add lemon juice or vinegar to taste. This dressing can be kept any length of time by bottling, not necessary to seal.

Practical Vegetarian Cookery (1897)


Salad Cream

Heat one half cupful of vinegar and one half cupful of sugar. When very hot add one half cupful of sour cream into which the yolks of two eggs have been beaten. Stir well, remove from the fire and then chill before using. Very nice on cabbage slaw.

Practical Vegetarian Cookery (1897)


Clayton’s Celebrated
California Salad Dressing

Take a bowl with a wooden spoon fitted to its bottom. Mix 2-3 tablespoons mustard until quite stiff. Pour on slowly 1/4 pint best olive oil, stirring rapidly until thick. Add 2-3 fresh eggs, mixed slightly. Pour on remaining 3/4 pint oil and stir rapidly until it forms a thick batter. Add a teacup full of best wine vinegar and juice of one lemon, a small tablespoon salt, one tablespoon white sugar. Stir well until all is incorporated. If bottled and sealed tightly, the dressing will remain good for months. For those not fond of oil, sweet cream of about 60 to 70 degrees in temperature is a good substitute though it doesn’t keep very well.

Clayton's Quaker Cookbook (1883)


Celery Vinegar

Cut four heads of celery in small pieces. Put them in an earthen jar with four ounces of celery seed, one ounce of pulverized sugar and half an ounce of salt. Pour two quarts of boiled vinegar, when hot, over this. Cover the jar, and in two weeks strain it through a filter. Bottle and cork well.

The Physiology of Taste: Harder’s Book of Practical American Cookery (in Six Volumes) (1885)


PICKLES AND PRESERVES

Sweet Watermelon
Rind Pickle

Take the melon rind and scrape all the meat from the inside, and then carefully slice all the outside of the rind from the white part of the rind, then lay or cover the white part over with salt. It will have to remain under salt one week before pickling; the rind will keep in salt from year to year. When you want to pickle it, take it from the salt and put into clear water, change the water three times a day –must be changed say every four hours – then take the rind from the water and dry it with a clean cloth. Have your vinegar boiling, and put the rind into it and let it lay in vinegar four days; then take it from the vinegar, drain, and sprinkle sugar thickly over it and let it remain so one day. To make syrup, take the syrup from the rind and add eight pounds more sugar to it, and put to boil; boil till a thick and clear syrup. Weigh ten pounds of rind to 12 pounds of sugar; cover the rind with four pounds of it and make the syrup with the remaining eight pounds. While the syrup is cooking add one teacupful of white ginger root and the peel of three lemons. When the syrup is cooked, then put the rind into the boiling syrup, and let it cook till you can pass a fork through it with ease, then it is done. When cooled, put in jar or bottles with one pint of vinegar to one quart of syrup, thus the pickles are made. See that they be well covered with vinegar and syrup as directed."

What Mrs. Fisher Knows about Old Southern Cooking: Soups, Pickles, Preserves, Etc.  (1881)


Candied Peaches
(Mexico)

Take 25 large peaches and let them lie in water for a little while; then remove the down by rubbing with a cloth. Stone them and put them in a kettle with two lbs granulated sugar – a layer of peaches and a layer of sugar — add one-half pint water and place on a moderate fire. When the syrup is thick, take off the fire, and put peaches and syrup together in a dish. Flatten the peaches with a wooden spoon and turn from time to time, putting them in a place where the sun will shine on them. When they are nearly dry roll in colored sugar. They will keep a long time.

Landmarks Club Cookbook (1903)


Sunny Southern
Preserved Oranges

Peel good-sized oranges, cut in inch slices and cover with cold water, allowing pint to each orange. Let stand 24 hours. Cook until tender. Add pint of sugar and the juice of 1 lemon for each orange. Cook until transparent. Place in jars, cover with syrup and seal.

Nellie Aldridge’s National Orange Show Cookbook (1928)

CONDIMENTS AND SAUCES

Grape Catsup

Five cupfuls of pulp or juice, one cupful of brown sugar, one cupful of vinegar, one teaspoonful of black pepper, one teaspoonful of cloves, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, and one teaspoonful of salt. Boil half away.

Los Angeles Cookery (1881)


Plum Catsup

Boil together for two hours nine pounds of seeded plums, six pounds of sugar, and three pints of the best cider vinegar. Just before removing from the fire add one tablespoonful each of cloves and allspice.

Los Angeles Cookery (1881)


Mushroom Catsup

Put mushrooms into a jar, squeeze them with your hand, strew with salt and let them lay two days. Strain through a coarse cloth, put them on the fire with allspice, cloves, mace and whole pepper. Boil well for an hour. Strain again. When cold, put into bottles.

How to Keep a Husband or Culinary Tactics (1872)


Bernalillo Chile Sauce

Twelve large tomatoes, twelve green chiles, twelve medium onions, chop well; three cups sugar, three cups vinegar, two teaspoons allspice, one teaspoon cayenne pepper, two heaping teaspoons salt. Boil all together till thick.

Landmarks Club Cookbook (1903)


Orange Sauce for Duck

juice of 1 orange
juice of 1 lemon
granted rind of 1 orange
grated rind of 1 lemon
1-3 cups corn syrup or sugar
1 tbs grated horseradish
2 tbs currant jelly

Strain orange and lemon juice, add the grated orange and lemon rinds, sugar, fresh horseradish, finely grated and currant jelly. Beat thoroughly. Bring to boiling point and serve.

Nellie Aldridge’s National Orange Show Cookbook (1928)

DESSERTS

Creole Oranges

2 cupfuls of sugar
cupful water
1 tbs lemon juice
6 oranges

Boil the sugar and water together for 5 minutes and add the lemon juice. Peel the oranges, slice. Cook a few slices at a time in the syrup about minutes. Place on a flat dish, pour the remaining syrup over the fruit, and chill on ice. Creole oranges may be served with whipped cream.

Nellie Aldridge’s National Orange Show Cookbook (1928)


Avocado Icecream

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
1 tsp vanilla
1 quart milk
1 pint cream
2 cups ripe avocado pulp
1 egg, white only
1 cup finely sliced avocado

Boil the sugar and water until it forms a syrup, then add vanilla.

Mix syrup with milk and cream and put in freezer for 10 minutes until partially frozen.

Combine avocado pulp with egg white and beat well.

Blend avocado pulp and slices with milk mixture and freeze hard.

The New Calavo Hostess Book (1932)

 


Boiled Orange Pudding

Pour a pint of milk on a half a pound of bread crumbs. Let it boil up. Stir in two ounces of butter, one of suet, keeping the pan over the fire until all is mixed. Let it stand still till cold then add two eggs, two ounces of sugar, the same of orange marmalade, one spoonful of orange flower water. Choose a basin that will exactly hold it. Tie over a flannel cloth loosely, closely. Boil it one and a quarter hours. Sauce of melted butter, sugar, a little lemon and brandy.

How to Keep a Husband or Culinary Tactics (1872)


Peaches a la Princesse

Halve six fine peaches, not too ripe, and place ina sauce pan with concave side up. Take one peach, peeled, and mince with a dozen macaroons, adding the yolk of an egg and half an ounce of sugar. Mix all well together and with this fill the half peaches. Moisten all with half a cup of white wine and sprinkle with sugar. Bake in a hot oven ten minutes and pour over zabaione and serve. This will make a most delicious dessert dish.

Bohemian San Francisco: Its Restaurants and Their Most Famous Recipes (1914)


Zabaione

Beat together, hard, for six minutes, six eggs and four teaspoonsful of powdered sugar in a double boiler and place over a gentle fire, never ceasing to whip until the contents become stiff enough to sustain a coffee spoon upright in the middle. While whipping add three wineglassfuls of Marsala and one liqueur glass of Maraschino brandy. Pour into tall glasses or cups and serve either hot or cold.

Bohemian San Francisco: Its Restaurants and Their Most Famous Recipes (1914)


Jumble Cake

One teacup of butter, one and one-half teacups of sugar, one and one-half pints of flour; four eggs, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one-half teacup of almonds chopped fine, two teaspoonfuls of yeast powder sifted in the flour. Beat the butter, sugar and eggs together, then add the flour. Put cinnamon and almonds in and work the whole up well, then roll on the board to thickness of half an inch, and cut out a finger’s length and join together at ends, so as to be round. Grease pans with butter and put to bake.

What Mrs. Fisher Knows about Old Southern Cooking: Soups, Pickles, Preserves, Etc.  (1881)


Orange Syrup

1 cup sugar
1 cup boiling water
1 tbs lemon juice
cup orange juice
grated rind of 1 orange

Boil sugar and water 5 minutes. Add the fruit juice and grated rind and continue boiling until the right consistency to pour.

Nellie Aldridge’s National Orange Show Cookbook (1928)


Copyright 2003 Seasonal Chef